Whether you’re planning a big summer party, looking to dine al fresco or simply wanting somewhere to sit with a good book and a cuppa, a quality wooden furniture set can make all the difference to your garden. And with a bit of care, your wooden furniture will look great year after year. It doesn’t take long to treat and look after your  garden furniture, and with our quick and easy guide, we’ll show you how…

Teak

Teak is a high quality, durable wood, that you can expect to weather well and last for many years – even generations! Its ability to retain its natural oils after felling makes it resistant to rotting and almost impervious to the effects of sun, rain, frost or snow, and protects it from dreaded fungi and other destructive parasites. Over time the surface of the wood will go from a honey brown colour to a beautiful silvery grey.

Teak won’t need a lot of maintenance, but help it go the distance by removing any build up of pollen, sap or mildew with mild soap and warm water. A good coat of teak wood oil after each clean will also help protect the wood’s natural honey colour. Teak oil seals hard and protects wood from the elements, and it dries relatively quickly – within 12 to 24 hours.

Top tip: Never use a hardwood oil as an alternative to teak oil on teak furniture, as this may discolour and spoil its overall look.

Acacia

With its warm tones and natural beauty, acacia is an extremely beautiful wood – and it’s highly practical too! The acacia tree grows incredibly slowly which makes the wood extremely hard and durable – allowing the furniture to be used for a long long time. With its natural resistance to stains and odours, it’s a popular wooden furniture choice. It can be easily cleaned with warm soapy water to remove any build ups of pollen, sap, or mildew.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus is renowned for its durability and strength, with its density, straight grain, smooth finish and honey colour with subtle natural rose highlights. It’s a great idea to treat hardwood furniture like eucalyptus with a good quality furniture oil with UV additives to protect it from the sun – Cuprinol Ultimate Furniture Oil will do the trick.

Keeping your garden furniture fresh

No matter what your furniture’s made of, good maintenance will help it last longer. Every now and then, give your furniture a thorough clean. Algae, dirt, dust and leaves have a habit of settling in and around furniture so start by brushing away loose dirt with a soft broom or cloth. A low powered garden hose will gently wash away stains and residue. For stuck-on dirt, use a sponge saturated with water and mild soap to wash away. Try to avoid using brass brushes, pressure washers or steel wool as they can damage and discolour the furniture’s surface.

Don’t forget Danish oil…

Danish Oil can be used on almost any wooden surface, making it an incredibly versatile product. It’s naturally water, food and alcohol resistant, making it great for outdoor dining sets. It is safe for food contact when dry and can be used on all softwood and hardwood, including oak and teak.

Protect, and it won’t get wrecked!

Although good quality wooden furniture can remain outdoors and go the distance if cared for, it’s always a good idea to store furniture away in a shed or garage. Furniture covers are also really handy for protecting your furniture from the elements, and great if you don’t have room for storage. This’ll help to keep your garden furniture in tip top condition!

Choosing a set

At Wilko, we’ve got a great range of furniture and accessories. From cushions to parasols, picnicware to bistro sets, we have everything you could need to make the most of the garden this summer. You won’t find better value than our 4 seater and 6 seater wooden furniture sets, and if you’re after something a little more extravagant, don’t miss the Torino recliner 6 seater garden set and Henley round garden set. For stylish seating, you’ll love the Napoli companion set and Drift sun lounger.

Check out our full outdoor living range at Wilko.com.

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